Stacking the Deck with RDK-B Architecture

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December 08, 2016
The RDK-B software stack enables high-velocity development to meet the growing demands on broadband networking for the home.
  • Technicolor acquired the Cisco division working on RDK-B in November 2015.
  • The team continues its drive to enhance RDK-B features, flexibility, and portability.

Today’s home is an unprecedented mix of connected devices, advanced entertainment options, immersive experiences, smart services, and the Internet of Things (IoT). None of this would be even remotely possible without broadband networking, and industry insiders are rallying around RDK-B – the reference design kit for broadband – to meet the increasing demand and complexity.

RDK-B is an open source software stack for delivering the standard gateways and managing the complex functions of broadband, including Wi-Fi, protocols like Bluetooth and Zigbee, and multicast video. It enjoys widespread support among system-on-a-chip (SoC) and customer premise equipment (CPE) providers, and service providers are eagerly developing RDK-B interfaces into their software.

“We wanted a software re-use approach,” says Technicolor’s Charles Moreman, Chief Architect, Connected Home, “and in order to do that, we had to create software components that perform specific tasks – and that are designed to be easily interconnected to build software for different products.”

Besides being extremely modular, the stack offers a number of other key benefits: it’s portable, delivers high performance, has a small footprint, supports multiple management interfaces, and it enables flexible, collaborative product development.

In the following Executive Report, read how Charles Moreman and his team continue to refine and improve upon RDK-B Architecture.